Readercon 23

Guests of Honor

Peter Straub

Peter Straub

Peter Straub is the author of nineteen novels: Marriages (Andre Deutsch, 1973), Under Venus (Stealth Press, 1985), Julia (Jonathan Cape, 1975), If You Could See Me Now (Jonathan Cape, 1977), Ghost Story (Jonathan Cape, 1979); the World Fantasy Award-nominated Shadowland (Coward McCann & Geohegan, 1980), the British Fantasy Award-winning Floating Dragon (Putnam, 1983), The Talisman (with Stephen King) (Viking/Putnam, 1984), the World Fantasy Award-winning Koko (Dutton, 1988), Mystery (Dutton, 1990), The Throat (Dutton, 1993) — these last three comprising the "Blue Rose Trilogy" — The Hellfire Club (Random House, 1996), the Stoker Award-winning Mr. X (Random House, 1999), Black House (with Stephen King) (Random House, 2001), lost boy lost girl (Random House, 2003), winner of both the Stoker and the International Horror Guild Awards, the Stoker Award-winning In the Night Room (Random House, 2004), and The Skylark (Subterranean Press, 2009), an early variant of A Dark Matter (Doubleday, 2010). He has published three collections of shorter fiction, Houses Without Doors (Dutton, 1990); the Stoker Award-winning Magic Terror (Random House, 2000), including the World Fantasy Award-winning "The Ghost Village" and "Mr. Clubb & Mr. Cuff," winner of both the International Horror Guild and Stoker Awards; and the Stoker Award-winning 5 Stories (Borderlands Books, 2007). His own honors include Grand Master at the World Horror Convention in 1998, the Bram Stoker Award for Lifetime Achievement in 2006, the International Horror Guild Living Legend Award in 2007, and the Barnes & Noble Writers for Writers Award in 2008. He has published one book of non-fiction, Sides (Cemetery Dance Publications, 2007), and three books of poetry, Ishmael (Turret Books, 1972), Open Air (Irish University Press, 1972), and Leeson Park and Belsize Square (Underwood Miller, 1983). He has edited Peter Straub's Ghosts (Borderlands Books, 1992), Conjunctions 39: New Wave Fabulists (Bard College, 2002), H.P. Lovecraft: Tales (Library of America, 2005), Poe's Children (2009), and The American Fantastic Tale (Library of America, two vols., 2009). His reviews have been published in TLS, The New Statesman, and The Washington Post.

 

Caitlín Kiernan

Caitlín Kiernan

The New York Times recently called Caitlín R. Kiernan "one of our essential writers of dark fiction." She is the author of various dark-fantasy novels, beginning with Silk (Roc/NAL, 1998), and followed by Threshold (Roc/NAL, 2001), Low Red Moon (Roc/NAL, 2003), The Five of Cups (Subterranean Press, 2003), Murder of Angels (Roc/NAL, 2004), Daughter of Hounds (Roc/NAL 2007), and The Red Tree (Roc/NAL, 2009). Most of her novels are now available as audiobooks from Audible.com. Her ninth novel, The Drowning Girl: A Memoir, will be released in April 2012 by Penguin, with the audiobook selected for Neil Gaiman Presents. Her short fiction, which has been has been collected in Tales of Pain and Wonder (Gauntlet Publications, 2000), Wrong Things (with Billy Martin; Subterranean Press, 2001), From Weird and Distant Shores (Subterranean Press, 2002), To Charles Fort, With Love (Subterranean Press, 2005), Alabaster (Subterranean Press, 2006), A is for Alien (Subterranean Press, 2009), The Ammonite Violin & Others (Subterranean Press, 2010), and, most recently, Confessions of a Five-Chambered Heart (Subterranean Press, 2012). In the autumn of 2011, Subterranean Press released Two Worlds and In Between: The Best of Caitlín R. Kiernan (Volume 1), a retrospective of her short fiction from 1993-2004 (a second volume is planned for 2014). The collection was named one of the six best f/sf novels of 2011. Two of her novellas have appeared as short hardbacks: In the Garden of Poisonous Flowers and The Dry Salvages (both from Subterranean Press, 2002 and 2004, respectively).

Her transformative "weird erotica" has been collected in two volumes, Frog Toes and Tentacles (2005) and Tales from the Woeful Platypus (Subterranean Press, 2007). Her erotica also appears in the monthly subscription-only PDF-zine Sirenia Digest (November 2004-present), which published its 79th issue in June 2010. Caitlín's chapbooks include Candles for Elizabeth (Meisha-Merlin 1998). "A Study for 'Estate'" (Gauntlet Publications, 2000), "On the Road to Jefferson" (Subterranean Press, 2002); "Waycross" (Subterranean Press , 2003), Embrace the Mutation (with J.K. Potter; Subterranean Press 2003), Trilobite: The Writing of Threshold (Subterranean Press, 2003), "Alabaster" (Camelot Books, 2003), "Mercury" (Subterranean Press, 2004), "The Worm in the Mind's Eye" (Subterranean Press, 2004), The Merewife: A Prologue (Subterranean Press, 2005), False/Starts: Being a Compendium of Beginnings (Subterranean Press, 2005), The Little Damned Book of Days (Subterranean Press, 2005), "Highway 97" (Subterranean Press, 2006); Tails of Tales of Pain and Wonder (Subterranean Press, 2008), B is for Beginnings (Subterranean Press, 2009), and "Sanderlings" (Subterranean Press, 2010). She wrote the novelization for Robert Zemeckis' Beowulf (HarperCollins, 2008), and scripted thirty-eight issues of the DC/Vertigo comic The Dreaming (October 1997-May 2001), along with two mini-series: The Girl Who Would Be Death (1998-1999) and Bast: Eternity Game (2003). In April 2012, she returned to comics and graphic novels (Dark Horse Comics), writing Alabaster, which features her albino monster-slayer, Dancy Flammarion.

Caitlín's work has been translated into many languages, including German, Portuguese, Spanish, Czech, Polish, Russian, Italian, Finnish, Korean, and Japanese. She's a four-time recipient of the International Horror Guild Award, four-time Stoker Award finalist, and two-time World Fantasy Award finalist. In 2010, her short story "Galápagos" was honored by the James Tiptree, Jr. Award Council, and The Red Tree and The Ammonite Violin & Others were both nominated for the Shirley Jackson Award (2009 and 2010, respectively). Caitlín recently appeared in Frank Woodward's award-winning documentary, Lovecraft: Fear of the Unknown (2008). Born near Dublin, Ireland, she now lives in Providence, RI. Trained as a vertebrate paleontologist, her research has been published in the Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, Journal of Paleontology, and Journal of the International Commission on Zoological Nomenclature. In 1988, she described a new genus of mosasaur, Selmasaurus, and she was the first to discover evidence of velociraptorine dinosaurs ("raptors") from the US Gulf Coast. Her first fiction sale was "Between the Flatirons and the Deep Green Sea" in 1993, and her first publication, the sf tale "Persephone," appeared in the March 1995 issue of the now-defunct Aberrations (#27). She is most emphatically not a "horror" writer.

 

Shirley Jackson

Shirley Jackson

Shirley Jackson, 1916-1965, one of the most brilliant and influential authors of the twentieth century, is widely acclaimed for her stories and novels of the supernatural, including the well-known short story "The Lottery" and the best-selling novel The Haunting of Hill House (1959). These works, along with We Have Always Lived in the Castle (1962) and other stories were collected in the recent Shirley Jackson: Novels and Stories (Library of America, 2010). A popular writer in her time, her work has received increasing attention from literary critics in recent years. She has influenced such writers as Neil Gaiman, Stephen King, Nigel Kneale and Richard Matheson. The Shirley Jackson Awards, established in 2007 and presented at Readercon, are a testament to her enduring influence.

Program Participants

171 participants attended Readercon 23

Click on the book icon to see the guest's bio-bibliography. * indicates former Guest of Honor, ** indicates Cordwainer Smith Award recipient.